ANZAC Cake for ANZAC Day Dessert

Anzac Cake for ANZAC Day Dessert

It’s not just important to teach our children about food; teaching them to prepare food for themselves and about nutrition. Sometimes the symbolism of what we eat and their various origins are the perfect way to educate our future generations on culture, history and the sacrifices of any pioneering effort. Lest we forget.

ANZAC Cake outofman.com
ANZAC Cake
outofman.com

ANZAC Cake outofman.com
ANZAC Cake
outofman.com

In the same spirit of reflecting on gratitude this week,today I am grateful for…the ANZACs (Australian and New Zealand Corps) who gave their lives so that we are able to live ours in absolute liberty in this unique great southern land, magnificent Australia. What better way to mark this important remembrance event on 25 April with not just the annual reverent ‘dawn
service’ and the meaningful ANZAC Day Parade, but followed by a really special dessert for tea with your family after!

I’ve always liked a certain element of surprise to remain fresh with the choice of desserts I present especially at get-togethers to mark special events like ANZAC Day. Last year we made a special homemade chocolate ice-cream to match our Anzac Biscuit Sandwich but this year I’m opting for something unconventional—an Anzac Cake! I found a remarkable recipe on Woman’s Day but I experimented with it to enhance the original with my own touches.

ANZAC Cake with honey- macadamia frosting outoman.com
ANZAC Cake with honey- macadamia frosting
outoman.com

The original recipe is also rather dense so you might even prefer to add more liquid to the batter if you like. I’ve found that it works very well with a little extra milk (as follows in my recipe below). I topped my Anzac Cake with a very ‘uniquely Australian’ frosting: well what do you reckon if it’s a delicious honey icing blanketed with golden roasted macadamia nuts drizzled with runny golden syrup…mmm…just another perfect dessert to pair with all we’re serving up in autumn’s comfort food menu, isn’t it.

ANZAC Cake with honey- macadamia frosting outoman.com
ANZAC Cake with honey- macadamia frosting
outoman.com
ANZAC Cake with honey- macadamia frosting outoman.com
ANZAC Cake with honey- macadamia frosting
outoman.com
ANZAC Cake outofman.com
ANZAC Cake
outofman.com

The batter itself tastes so much like an Anzac cookie (yup, couldn’t resist a bit of a taster’s lick) that while I was working on this cake I just knew it would be the perfect dessert to serve for Anzac Day. It’s not just important to teach our children about food; teaching them to prepare food for themselves and about nutrition. Sometimes the symbolism of what we eat and their various origins are the perfect way to educate our future generations on culture, history and the sacrifices of any pioneering effort. Lest we forget.

You may also like:
Anzac Biscuit Chocolate Ice-cream Sandwich Crunch

ANZAC DAY Trivia

Ingredients for Anzac Cake: (inspired by and adapted from Woman’s Day)

125g butter, chopped
½ cup golden syrup
2 cups self-raising flour (sifted)
½ cup shredded or desiccated coconut
¼ cup rolled oats
½ cup caster sugar
1 ½ cup milk
2 eggs

Honey-Macadamia Frosting:
1½ cups pure icing sugar
60g butter, melted
1 TB honey
1 teaspoon vanilla essence
½ to 1 TB milk (add ½ first)
200g macadamia nuts (roasted and coarsely crushed)
2-3 TB golden syrup (for drizzling)

Directions for Honey-Macadamia Frosting:
Preheat your oven to 180°C. Grease and line either a 20 x 30 slice pan. An alternative to this which I tried was a deep round baking tin of about 21 cm in diameter. Roast those macadamias for about 10 minutes at 130-140 degrees. Remove immediately on done. Don’t let them burn! I used a nutcracker to crush them coarsely. You could also pound them lightly to break them out but we’re after larger crunchy chunks to add a great texture—not fine ground nuts.

In a small saucepan, combine the butter and golden syrup. Stir over low heat until
smooth and the butter has completely melted. 
 In your large mixing bowl (I’d used my KitchenAid) Combine the sugar with the melted butter mixture and gently whisk on low to medium speed gradually. Add the sifted flour and whisk slowly, adding just half the milk a little at a time to mix well. Add the eggs one by one and whisk further, then add the desiccated
coconut, oats and the rest of the milk.Pour mixture into the prepared pan. Bake for 25-30 minutes until cooked when tested. Turn the cake onto a wire rack to cool completely. I stored mine in the fridge (after it was cool to the touch) overnight for a fully chilled cake before frosting. 


Directions for Icing: 
Once the cake is cooled completely and ready for the frosting–in a bowl, combine sifted pure icing sugar, melted butter, honey, vanilla essence, and enough milk (half to 1 TB is usually enough) to make a thick, spreadable icing. I used a small handheld whisker to beat it lightly to ensure there are no lumps.
 Spread icing over the top and sides of cooled cake. Press in the crushed macadamia nuts all over the top as evenly as you can. Drizzle with some golden syrup all over the nuts. (Cake can be stored in an airtight container for about 1-2 days in a cool dry place).

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